How To Make Scrap Fabric Twine

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If you are anything like me, you end up with a lot of scrap fabric. My scrap bag is always full, and I’ve even written a post with a host of ideas on how to use every last piece. But what to do with all the long thin pieces that can’t be used for anything else? Well, here is an idea for using all of those up too! Here is how to make scrap fabric twine.

 

How To Make Scrap Fabric Twine

 

How To Make Scrap Fabric Twine - repurpose all your long thin cloth remnants, upcycling and repurposing them into something new & useful. This thin rope has a host of uses, from jewellery to zero waste packaging and wrapping. Great zero waste up cycling project. Be sustainable and ecofriendly by stopping all these scrap fabric pieces from ending up in landfill #fabricscraps #zerowaste #recycle #sustainable #upcycled #upcycling

 

I hate throwing any fabric away, and try to always use up all my scraps. A lot of the time I can get small sewn items out of my remnants.

But then there are just those times when the pieces are too thin to do anything with, and they get put in a bag to be used as stuffing or appliqué for other projects. This idea will use up most of these.

 

You Will Need 

  • Cloth remnants – woven cloth remnants such as cotton, lawns and poly cotton work best 
  • Scissors or a rotary cutter/cutting mat
  • Safety pins

 

Starting To Make The Twine

 

I make my cloth remnants about 3cm (just over 1 inch) wide. It doesn’t matter how long they are, but I tend to only use the ones longer than 6 inches or so. Any shorter than that and you are constantly adding pieces in, which can look scrappy.

Woven remnants work better. If you do have jersey remnants, they tend to stretch and be a bit too bulky, so I would use these for a rag rug or for stuffing for other projects.

Take two strips, one longer than the other. This is because you don’t want to be adding new pieces to both strands at once, or your twine will be very weak at the double join.

 

Starting To Make Twine

 

Knot the strips at one end, and I secure the knot to a chair or the fabric on my knee. Then it is time to start twining!

 

Twining the fabric

 

Twist the right hand side fabric piece away from you. Once you twist it a few times you will see it form a tight thin rope like bundle. Keeping it taut, pass the right strand over the left strand and into your left hand. Place what was the left strand into your right hand, and twist it away from you until this too forms a bundle. Again, pass this over the other strand and into your left hand. You’ve started to make fabric scrap twine!

Making twine from fabric scraps

Every so often, I like to pin a section of twine closer to my chair or knee. I find this keeps the twine taut better.

 

Adding New Pieces To The Twine

 

Once you come to the end of one of the twine pieces, it is time to add in a new piece. Leaving about an inch ‘tail’ on the old piece, place the new piece over the top of the old piece. Then twist both pieces together as you twine the new piece with the old. 

The join can be a little weak, which is why you don’t want both pieces to need joins at the same time. Plus, the join is inevitably slightly more bulky due to the double thickness. So do bear this in mind for if you want to use the twine for jewellery etc.

 

Finishing Off

 

You can leave the twine unfinished if you know you are going to be adding to it in the future. But for finishing off the end, keep both twine strands taut and place a tight knot in the end.

To keep your twine tidy, you can wrap it around an old bobbin, or piece of card.

 

How To Make Scrap Fabric Twine - repurpose all your long thin cloth remnants, upcycling and repurposing them into something new & useful. This thin rope has a host of uses, from jewellery to zero waste packaging and wrapping. Great zero waste up cycling project. Be sustainable and ecofriendly by stopping all these scrap fabric pieces from ending up in landfill #fabricscraps #zerowaste #recycle #sustainable #upcycled #upcycling

 

Want To See Fabric Scrap Twine Being Made?

 

I’ve made a short instructional video, and it’s over here on YouTube. Go take a look!

 

What To Make With Your Fabric Scrap Twine

 

Scrap fabric twine has a host of uses. 

  • Making jewellery, just add beads to make necklaces or bracelets.
  • Using to tie around presents as a zero waste wrapping substitute
  • Sew it together to make other projects.
  • Use it as the basis for bunting

Why not think of your own uses? Now I have shown you how to make fabric scrap twine, I am sure you’ll be addicted once you start. And I love to see your makes. Do comment below, or send me a picture on my social media channels.

 

Need other ideas for these thin fabric scrap pieces? Why not try making a rag rug ? Or a rag wreath?

And please do pin this post for later

How To Make Scrap Fabric Twine - repurpose all your long thin cloth remnants, upcycling and repurposing them into something new & useful. This thin rope has a host of uses, from jewellery to zero waste packaging and wrapping. Great zero waste up cycling project. Be sustainable and ecofriendly by stopping all these scrap fabric pieces from ending up in landfill #fabricscraps #zerowaste #recycle #sustainable #upcycled #upcycling

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